1. taweeelashawq:


The Shahada written in the style of chinese calligraphy

    taweeelashawq:

    The Shahada written in the style of chinese calligraphy

     
  2. (via poerora)

     
  3. thenewenlightenmentage:

Brain function ‘boosted for days after reading a novel’
Reading a gripping novel causes biological changes in the brain which last for days as the mind is transported into the body of the protagonist
Being pulled into the world of a gripping novel can trigger actual, measurable changes in the brain that linger for at least five days after reading, scientists have said.
Continue Reading

    thenewenlightenmentage:

    Brain function ‘boosted for days after reading a novel’

    Reading a gripping novel causes biological changes in the brain which last for days as the mind is transported into the body of the protagonist

    Being pulled into the world of a gripping novel can trigger actual, measurable changes in the brain that linger for at least five days after reading, scientists have said.

    Continue Reading

    (via i-will-be-faded)

     
  4. unfortunatesalmon:

sheetmetalsheep:

"No."

"I’m going on an adventure!""No you aren’t, come eat your fruit.""mOOOMMMM"

Years later:

    unfortunatesalmon:

    sheetmetalsheep:

    "No."

    "I’m going on an adventure!"
    "No you aren’t, come eat your fruit."
    "mOOOMMMM"

    Years later:

    (via syuhadahazri)

     
  5. darkfae87:

    love-run-breathe-repeat:

    serenakenobi:

    milisaz:

    Because library porn

    GOOD GRIEF

    Fuck

    Damn, now that’s good porn

    (Source: maleficent-z, via pupuyalis)

     
  6. Qalamdan (pen-case or pen-box) from Abbasid and Ottoman empires

    The bottom picture is the tools of an Ottoman katib (read the caption to know which tool is which). The pen-case has an ink well which holds silk fibers soaked with ink and dried to which drops of water can be added when needed. If you look closely at the pen-rest, there is a raised and grooved part for the reed pen to rest. The groove was designed in a way that the tip of the reed pen could be trimmed at an angle consistently each time. The handles of the scissors were shaped to bear one of the names of Allah “Ya Fattah!” (O He Who opens!).

    (Source: columbia.edu)

     

     Islamic Art 

  7. I’m reviving back the #islamic art tag and starting a new one #bookbytes.

    Here’s hoping to a more productive tumblr-ing (is this even a word?) inshaAllah. Because I need some kind of distraction from the lab!

     
  8. Glass coins from early Islamic caliphate (Abbasid, Fatimid and Umayyad)

    The inscription on the Umayyad coin (green with the long text): “In the Name of Allah. God ordered honesty, and ordered the manufacture of one quarter [qist], al-Qasim bin ‘Ubayd Allah. At the hands of Zaffar bin Shaba. Year two and twenty and one hundred.” 

    (Source: bonhams.com)

     

     Islamic Art 

  9. Islam at the Crossroads by Muhammad Asad
Why you should read it? Because even though this was written in the 1930s, it gives a succinct perspective of the problems in the ummah (amazingly still prevalent in today’s society as it was back in the 1930s) and how to live practically and spiritually as a Muslim in a world which upholds the Western values.

    Islam at the Crossroads by Muhammad Asad

    Why you should read it? Because even though this was written in the 1930s, it gives a succinct perspective of the problems in the ummah (amazingly still prevalent in today’s society as it was back in the 1930s) and how to live practically and spiritually as a Muslim in a world which upholds the Western values.

     

     bookbytes 

  10. (Source: small-deeds, via herkipos)